Cop Arrested for Pulling Woman Over, Kidnapping, then Raping Her

Matt Agorist | The Free Thought Project

Fort Pierce, FL — For the majority of people who see those red and blue lights turn on behind them as they drive down the highway, your adrenaline spikes, your heart races, and the last thing going through your mind is, “I am being protected right now.” While most of these stops end with a promissory note of extortion for a victimless crime, sometimes, especially for women, things can get quite dangerous.





As the Free Thought Project has reported countless times, all too often, police officers will abuse their authority to force unwilling victims into performing sexual favors in exchange for leniency. Also, many times, there is no quid pro quo and police officers will simply rape people they pull over — case in point, Daniel Holtzclaw.

A young Florida woman has learned the hard way about police rape last week when she was stopped by St. Lucie County Sheriff’s Deputy, Evan Cramer, 28.





According to Sheriff Ken Mascara, Cramer pulled over his latest victim last Tuesday night for a minor traffic violation. However, instead of simply writing a ticket and moving on, Cramer proceeded to use his authority to rape this woman.

Cramer is accused of telling the victim she had multiple warrants out for her arrest and said she could avoid jail time if she granted sexual favors, Mascara said.

According to police, Cramer then kidnapped his victim, threw her in the back of his cruiser, drove her to a vacant car lot, and raped her.

Immediately after it happened, his frightened victim then went to the local hospital to report she’d been raped.

READ MORE:  Cop Fired After Reporting Supervisor’s Practice of Rating Female Drivers on ‘Rapability’ Scale

“She was terrified,” said Sheriff Ken Mascara. “You could hear it in her voice. You could see it. It was palpable.”

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2147 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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