Cop Charged With Groping Woman at Traffic Stop, Trying to Kiss Her – “Don’t Tell Anyone About This”

officer selders

BATON ROUGE — A woman never expected to that she would be pulled over by a cop, only to be groped.

Officer Michael Selders pulled over a a woman for a “traffic stop” on Saturday morning near Port Hudson Pride Road, according to reports.

The woman was driving home after work and said that Officer Selders had already been a customer where she worked.

It’s possible that he had his eyes on her for a while and followed her when she left.

Once he pulled her over, he commanded her to exit her vehicle.

She got out of her car as instructed, and that’s when Officer Selders began using his hands to grope her body, according to reports.

He is reported to have fondled her breasts and her vagina, then trying to lean over and kiss her.

When the woman realized what was happening she quickly turned away from him moved away.

She went back to her car to leave, and that’s when Officer Selders walked up closer to her car and said, “Don’t tell anyone about this.”

RELATED: Woman Raped by Cop After Stopping at Checkpoint, “If You Tell Anyone About This I’ll Kill Your Family”

The woman immediately reported the incident.

Officer Selders said he had just pulled her over for “running a red light.”

But his story about the traffic stop was found to be inconsistent, and he also never documented it by calling it in, which is a violation of protocol.

Officer Selders has been granted paid administrative leave while an internal investigation is conducted, according to reports.

RELATED: Woman Calls 911 For Help, Cop Shows Up and Rapes Her

He has been charged with sexual battery and malfeasance in office.

Watch the video below:

If you haven't already, be sure to like our Filming Cops Page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Please visit our sister site Smokers ONLY

Sign Up To Receive Your Free E-Book
‘Advanced Strategies On Filming Police’


About author

Filming Cops
Filming Cops 4685 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

You might also like