Cop With Five Pounds of Marijuana in His House Won’t Face Charges

weed

Rick Hurd | Contra Costa Times

RICHMOND — A Richmond police officer found with marijuana in his home earlier this year likely won’t be charged with a crime, authorities said, but his future on the police force is undetermined.

Joe Avila, Bosco

Veteran K-9 officer Joe Avila has been on paid administrative leave since September, pending an internal investigation, officials in the Richmond Police Department said.

The Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office has been investigating since the case came to its attention earlier this year but is not inclined to file charges, said Robin Lipetzky, the county’s chief public defender.

According to Lipetzky, the decision likely stems from evidence not strong enough to produce a conviction.

A search warrant affidavit obtained by this newspaper shows that Avila picked up a box containing about 4 to 5 pounds of marijuana from a UPS store on Nov. 25, 2013.

Avila then radioed a dispatcher to say that he would file an incident report.

Avila never did so, according to the search warrant.

Instead, in what several police sources have said is a violation of Richmond police policy, the marijuana ended up in his Oakley home instead of being placed into a department evidence locker.

RELATED: Cop Who Advocated Imprisoning Americans for “War on Drugs” Gets Caught Speeding With 24 Pounds of Marijuana in His Car

The matter came to officials’ attention after an officer was assigned in January 2014 to investigate Avila’s alleged failure to write more than three dozen police reports, the warrant said.

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 4685 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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