Cops Forced Innocent Man to Purchase Drugs So They Could Build Cases

Monica Pais | Courthouse News Service

(CN) – A Miami-Dade County man claims in a federal lawsuit that he was beaten up by several police officers during a traffic stop and then taken on a joyride by the officers who forced him to purchase drugs to make cases for them.

In a complaint filed in the federal court in Miami, plaintiff Azzam Masri says he was driving his pickup truck near downtown Miami on the night of Nov. 14, 2012, when one of two unmarked police vehicles traveling behind him suddenly tapped his bumper, signaling him to stop.

Masri claims that after he came to a full stop, defendant Officer Daniel Fonticiella pulled open the driver-side door and dragged him from his car.

Masri says Fonticiella struck him on the back of the head, causing him to fall face down onto the pavement.

According to the Nov. 10 complaint, the other officers at the scene were defendants Franco Cugge, Lourdes Hernandez and Radames Perez.

Masri says the officers hustled him into handcuffs and held him until Sgt. Robert Perez and Sgt. Thomas Martinez arrived. As recounted in the complaint, Perez and Martinez told two of the officers to Masri without his consent and without a valid warrant.

“The defendant Officers also searched the plaintiff’s vehicle without plaintiff’s consent damaging the interior of the car in the process,” the complaint says.

Masri claims he was then put in the rear passenger seat of his truck and told that he going to be driven around the area “with the intent of purchasing narcotics to make cases for the officers.”

He says throughout the drive, which lasted about 45 minutes, he repeatedly complained of being in pain and asked the officers to take him to the hospital.

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2662 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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