Graphic Video Shows Aftermath Of Teen Shot By Conneticut Cop

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A video reportedly showing the immediate aftermath of a police-involved shooting in Bridgeport, Conn. has family members questioning if police allowed a 15-year-old to needlessly die and have claimed it proves the police lied about the incident.

Jayson Negron was shot and killed by police this week, but a grainy, amateur video reportedly obtained by state police is raising several questions as to whether his death could have been prevented. The video appears to show Negron’s head moving from a rightward position to face down.

Giovanni Rivera, 24, apparently the cousin of the victim, posted the video — which police admit to have seen.
Rivera also posted a sad message on May 12 to both accounts alleging the incident didn’t have to turn fatal, saying “I’m in so much pain right now, they left my baby cousin on the ground to die.”

According to authorities, Bridgeport Officer James Boulay, 30, opened fire on Negron after the latter allegedly struck the officer in a stolen vehicle. The 15-year-old was then pronounced dead at the scene.

Rivera said Bridgeport police told his family that Negron was killed by a gunshot wound to the head. He believes the video shows otherwise,according to Hartford Courant.

“If that crucial part of the story is a lie, everything else is up for question,” he said.

Julian Fyffe, 21, of Bridgeport, the passenger in the allegedly stolen vehicle, was taken to the hospital after sustaining a gunshot wound to the shoulder. He’s expected to make a full recovery.

No weapons were discovered in the vehicle.

In the minute-long clip, Negron is shown, handcuffed, lying face down on the ground. At one point, the camera pans away from the victim. Once it finds him again, his head has turned a different direction as an officer is seen standing close by which contradicts the polices version of the story.

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2412 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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