“They Kept Shooting”: Father of 6yo Boy Killed by Cops Speaks Out for First Time

“The only thing I heard was gunshots. Then I heard verbal commands after they were through firing,” Few said. “I stuck my hands out the window. They kept firing.”

Matt Agorist | The Free Thought Project

Marksville, LA — It is now day three of the trial for Derrick Stafford, one of two officers charged with the 2015 murder of six-year-old Jeremy Mardis.

Jeremy’s father, Chris Few, who was also shot that fateful night, took the stand Tuesday and spoke about the murder of his son for the first time in public.

During his heartbreaking testimony, Few noted that officers Derrick Stafford and Norris Greenhouse Jr. immediately started firing — with no warning.

“The only thing I heard was gunshots. Then I heard verbal commands after they were through firing,” Few said. “I stuck my hands out the window. They kept firing.”

After he was shot, Few lost consciousness and didn’t know his son died until he woke up in a hospital six days later — the day of Jeremy’s funeral.

Matthew Derbes, a prosecutor in the case asked Few if he regrets not immediately stopping his car that night.

“Most definitely,” Few said. “Every day.”

However, Few noted that he was merely trying to catch up with the car in front of him, driven by his then girlfriend, so he could give Mardis to her in case he was arrested.

“The whole reason there was even a chase was for his well-being,” he said.

Few said his son remained calm as they drove after his girlfriend. “He always liked going on rides,” Few said of his son who was diagnosed with autism at age two.

Continue to full article at The Free Thought Project. 

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Filming Cops
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Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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