Man Beaten at Protest Says Police Were Indifferent to Attack

In this Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017 photo, DeAndre Harris, bottom is assaulted in a parking garage beside the Charlottesville police station after a white nationalist rally was disbursed by police, in Charlottesville, Va.

McLEAN, Va. — A Virginia man says police failed to come to his aid as he was beaten by white supremacists during Saturday’s violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia, that led to three deaths.

Photos and video of the beating inflicted on 21-year-old DeAndre Harris have gone viral. Police said Tuesday they are investigating the incident, portions of which were captured on video. One person of interest has been identified, but no arrests have been made, city spokeswoman Miriam Dickler said in a text message.

Harris was beaten in a parking garage right next to the city police station.

Zach Roberts, a documentary photographer, said he told police officers immediately after the beating what occurred and that he had photos of the attack, but they were not interested at the time.

Hundreds of white nationalists, white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and others converged on Charlottesville Saturday, ostensibly in an effort unite right-wing factions in a city that became a flashpoint due to a prolonged debate about what to do with a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Rally participants clashed frequently with counter-protesters. One man linked to white nationalist groups, 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. of Ohio, has been charged with murder and other counts after a fatal hit-and-run crash that killed woman and injured 19 others.

Harris, an instructional assistant at Charlottesville City Schools, did not respond to messages from The Associated Press seeking comment. A GoFundMe page set up to help him with his medical bills quickly raised more than $125,000.

Pages: 1 2 3

Sign Up To Receive Your Free E-Book
‘Advanced Strategies On Filming Police’


About author

Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2702 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

You might also like