New Police Program Gets Addicts Treatment Instead of Arresting Them

Whitney Webb | True Activist

Drug addiction in America is an ever-growing epidemic and a “war” that we are losing. Throwing addicts in jail has proven ineffective given the nature of drug addiction and so hundreds of police departments around the US have started using drug treatment as an alternative to imprisonment.




For instance, the Gloucester County Police Department in Massachusetts has created a revolutionary new policing strategy called the Angel program, aimed at getting addicts the help they need, instead of putting them in handcuffs.

This program has had so much success that it has turned heads and convinced other law enforcement departments to follow their lead.

The nature of drug addiction is difficult to understand for many people. Many assume that people who consume drugs lack moral discipline or will power, and that they can stop using drugs whenever they decide to.

With this mentality, people look at drug users as criminals or simply a bad element of society that should be locked up and forgotten. Yet, this is not the case for much of the drug consuming population. As a matter of fact, most people use drugs for the first time when they are just teenagers.





There were over 2.8 million new users of illicit drugs in 2013, which comes to 7,800 new users per day. Over half (54.1 percent) were under 18 years of age.

Many prestigious colleges are even set in high drug trafficking zones, causing many college students to be exposed to “hard” drugs at a young age. Many of these drugs are extremely powerful, fogging the mind of the user. Some of these users claim to have lost control, committing crimes to buy the drug, selling their belongings, or even resorting to prostitution.

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2390 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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