Scandal Rocks Ohio: As Many as 70 Child Rape Cases Were “Ignored” by Prosecutors

Cleveland, OH — In the land of the free, those tasked with ‘protecting’ society — often and with extreme prejudice — fall far short of providing anything resembling actual safety. Instead, law enforcement in America often chooses profit over people. An outrageous case out of Cleveland Ohio proves this point by illustrating that authorities are more interested in making pot busts than they are prosecuting those who rape children.





When prosecutor Michael O’Malley first took office last month, he began looking into hundreds of cases marked ‘inactive’ in the computer system. As he began reviewing those cases, he found dozens of instances of rape and sexual assault cases involving children that he said prosecutors “ignored.”

“There was a conscious decision (by prosecutors) to make some of these cases inactive,” O’Malley said. “It’s outrageous.”

O’Malley has discovered around 70 cases so far, but because there are more than 1,900 cases in the system, he expects to find even more.

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The incompetence and sheer failure of prosecutors to close these cases are more glaring than the thousands of rape kits that are collecting dust in police departments across the state as many of these cases involve an actual confession from the suspect. 

According to the Associated Press, some of the victims in the 70 cases were as young as 3 years old. And some of the cases, which date back three years, would have been easy to prosecute because suspects confessed, O’Malley said.





“We’re peeling the layers of an onion,” O’Malley said of the investigation into the disgusting act of ignoring child rape. “And every day there are more revelations.”

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Amid the despicable dereliction, or possibly worse, at least three prosecutors have been forced to resign and four others have been disciplined.

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2412 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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