[WATCH] Man Paralysed After Being Shot Four Times by Pittsburgh Police Walks Again

A man who was paralysed after being shot four times by US police has released a video showing the extent to which he has recovered from the controversial 2012 shooting.

Leon Ford was pulled over by police in Pittsburgh five years ago for failing to come to a complete standstill at a junction. Police later reported he had been “driving too fast”.

According to police records, the 19-year-old Mr Ford handed over his licence, vehicle registration and proof of insurance.

But less than 20 minutes later the unarmed man had been shot by Pittsburgh police officer David Derbish, who fired five times, hitting Mr Ford four times in the chest and leaving him paralysed from the waist down.

Audio recordings from the police car revealed that officers had been confused over Mr Ford’s identity, despite all the paperwork he gave them later proving to be correct.

Police body-microphones were not working during the arrest, but film of the interaction shows Mr Derbish get inside the car with Mr Ford, and the car suddenly moving off with the officer inside.

After six seconds shots were fired and the car crashed, resulting in the dislocation of the policeman’s thumb.

Later, Mr Derbish testified that Mr Ford had a “mysterious bulge” in his trousers that he thought was a gun. So in an effort to “stop the threat”, he drew his gun and fired five times.

The officers’ actions were later found to have been in violation of police procedures, namely for not wearing working audio equipment, for reaching into the suspect’s car while the engine was running, and the decision to shoot while the car was moving.

Mr Ford was initially charged with aggravated assault and several lesser charges including endangering police officers and resisting arrest.

Pages: 1 2

Sign Up To Receive Your Free E-Book
‘Advanced Strategies On Filming Police’


About author

Filming Cops
Filming Cops 2662 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

You might also like