Alaska Cops Defend Their ‘Right’ to Sexual Contact With Sex Workers Before Arresting Them

4202565878-66a1bd7ab7-z

There’s a heated debate going on right now in Alaska between the police department and sex workers’ rights advocates over a bill that would make it illegal for police officers to have sexual contact with sex workers before arresting them. If Alaska passes this bill, they’ll become the first state to outlaw any sexual contact between police and the people they’re investigating. Only two months ago, Michigan became the last state in the U.S. to make it illegal for police officers to sexually penetrate sex workers in the course of an investigation.

Advocates of Alaska’s House Bill 73 and Senate Bill 112 say that police catching sex workers in the act by engaging with them sexually is a human rights violation, and Amnesty International has made an official statement supporting that claim: “Such conduct is an abuse of authority and in some instances amounts to rape and/or entrapment.”

“It’s incredibly traumatic to be tricked into having sex with someone who stops in the middle and puts you in handcuffs and takes you against your will to be locked up in a jail cell,” explained Terra Burns, one of the founders of Community United for Safety and Protection (CUSP), a group of current and former sex workers, sex trafficking victims, and allies working towards safety and protection for everyone in Alaska’s sex trade. “Women have told me that years later they still have PTSD symptoms when they see a police car.”

But police in Alaska say that if they can’t touch sex workers at all, they have no chance of conducting successful undercover investigations. The problem with the bill, Alaska cops explain, is that their covers will be too easily blown by savvy sex workers who know what officers are and are not allowed to do, and employ a tactic called “cop checking” to sniff them out.

“(In an undercover investigation) they ask one simple question: ‘Touch my breast.’ OK, I’m out of the car. Done. And the case is over,” Anchorage Police Department Deputy Chief Sean Case told the Alaska Dispatch News in a hypothetical example. “If we make that act (of touching) a misdemeanor, we have absolutely no way of getting involved in that type of arrest.”

For the full article visit: https://www.glamour.com/story/alaska-cops-defend-sexual-contact-sex-workers-arrests?mbid=social_facebook_referral

If you haven't already, be sure to like our Filming Cops Page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Please visit our sister site Smokers ONLY

Sign Up To Receive Your Free E-Book
‘Advanced Strategies On Filming Police’


About author

Filming Cops
Filming Cops 5620 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

You might also like