Cop Reported for Steroid Drug Deals INSIDE Police Station in Uniform

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Around four months ago, central Pennsylvania Police Officer Matthew McMurray pulled over a man for a traffic violation.

This person did not have a driver’s license, but he agreed to pass on some information about drug activity to the cop.

Instead of pursuing the matter for its illegal nature, the cop expressed interest in acquiring some pain killer medication. He did not give the man a ticket either.




The pair started meeting at different spots in the city, but mostly frequented the Northern Camria borough garage to exchange pills and steroids.

The 26-year-old officer worked out often and participated in various competitions, hence he used medication to improve his performance.

On Monday this week he texted McMurray to meet him so the two could exchange drugs – he would give oxycodone in return for steroids from the cop.


The former went over to the Northern Cambria police station just after 10 PM, where the officer was on an overnight shift; he then completed transaction with the police officer.

Little did the man in uniform know that the man he was dealing with was a confidential informant, and this was to be their last encounter.

That night after the exchange taken place, the man stepped outside and signaled detectives indicating that the deal had been completed.




According to the Cambria County Drug Task Force, McMurray did not provide the informant with their steroids although he did take the oxycodone pills.

The police officer was arrested for carrying out a drug transaction while on duty. He was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia owing to hypodermic needles found in his possession.



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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 5620 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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