WATCH: Man Arrested and Tortured To Death In Restraining Chair For 21 Hours

A Missouri court determined that the life of 43-year-old Richard Watson is worth exactly $250,000. That’s how much they paid his mother, Jane Brown who filed suit against the state after deputies essentially tortured Watson to death over the course of 21 hours.

It all happened at the Jasper County Jail back on December 18th, 2012, but the suit was recently settled, attorney Brandon Potter said.

Watson had only been behind bars for eight days when deputies strapped him down to a restraining chair and left him there for a fully 21-hours. All the while, they denied him proper food, water and medication.

For a little perspective, the chair’s manufacturer warns that no one should ever be left in it for more than two hours.

Watson explained to jail staff that he had high blood pressure, as well as back pain, and anxiety and depression. They didn’t care.

Watson further advised them that he was on a dozen medications. By denying him access to these or even proper food and water, Watson was essentially tortured to death. The lawsuit explains that he died
“constantly thrashing” and “throwing himself against the restraints” while in the chair until he “seemed to relax and died.”

The autopsy confirmed that Watson died from heart difficulties caused by “strenuous exercise of agitation induced by… withdrawal.”

“At no time was he combative,” Brown explained. The video confirms this. His mother adds that it shows clearly that “he was going through withdrawal and seizures.”

Watch the video below…

Source: http://countercurrentnews.info/2015/03/jailed-man-life-only-worth-250000/

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Filming Cops
Filming Cops 5620 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

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