USA: Number of Prisoners Now Exceeds High School Teachers and Engineers

If sitting in a prison cell was a job, it would be one of the most common jobs in the United States. In 2012, there were some 1,570,000 inmates in state and federal prisons in the U.S., according to data from the Justice Department.

By contrast, there were about 1,530,000 engineers in America last year, 815,000 construction workers, and 1 million high school teachers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

Screen Shot 2013-11-08 at 9.25.20 AM

To be clear, some occupations are much bigger than the prison population: More than 4 million Americans worked in retail sales last year, and more than 6 million served food and drinks.

Still, the Justice Department’s prison number doesn’t include inmates who are incarcerated in county or city jails.




That number is hard to come by, since counties and cities keep their own records and don’t report to a central authority.

A few years ago, even more people were locked up.

But states around the country have begun pulling back from the sentencing policies that characterized the war on drugs, and the prison population has declined by about 45,000 inmates from its peak in 2009, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Even so, there are nearly five times as many people in prison as there were in 1980, when the drug war was just getting underway.

“Nearly half of the inmates filling our federal prisons are incarcerated for drug offenses,” Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho) said in a statement last week.

Labrador and Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) recently teamed up to introduce the latest legislation aimed at reforming the country’s sentencing laws, joining Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), and others from both sides of the partisan divide.

“Granting federal judges more discretion in sentencing for nonviolent drug offenses is the right thing to do,” Scott said in a statement.

“Studies of mandatory minimums conclude that they fail to reduce crime, they waste the taxpayers’ money, and they often require the imposition of sentences that violate common sense.”

 | HuffPo

If you haven't already, be sure to like our Filming Cops Page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Please visit our sister site Smokers ONLY

Sign Up To Receive Your Free E-Book
‘Advanced Strategies On Filming Police’


About author

Filming Cops
Filming Cops 5463 posts

Filming Cops was started in 2010 as a conglomerative blogging service documenting police abuse. The aim isn’t to demonize the natural concept of security provision as such, but to highlight specific cases of State-monopolized police brutality that are otherwise ignored by traditional media outlets.

You might also like